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] at the three of us got up and left. [laughter] [applause] and i've never seen the whole movie. [laughter] i wrote screenplays in the '70s, thinking i would be good at it, but wore myself out rewriting scripts for producers who nearly always believed that plot needed more back story. in the winter of 72, swanee called me and asked if i'd read the book by george higgins. i told him i hadn't, hadn't heard of it, and swanee said this is your kind of book. this is your kind of stuff, kiddo your run out and get it before you write another word. i got the book and read the opening sentence in the store. jackie brown, at 26, with no expression on his face, said that he could get some guns. i finished the book at home in one sitting, it was like 180 pages, and felt like i had been set free. he moved to story almost entirely with dialogue. the conversations of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style of his writing. i stopped trying to care what was going on in my books, and begin to show, begin to show what from the points of view and the voices of the characters. bad guys and good on
use of taxpayers money and time? >> i have no idea of the particular incident the honorable gentleman to talk about but i will look into it and give him an answer. >> order. questions for the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker,. >> thank you, mr. speaker. before listing my engagements i am sure the whole house will wish to enjoy -- join me in sending our best wishes for christmas to brave forces in afghanistan. to the families will be missing them and the servicemen and women around the world you are always in our thoughts. we owe you a deep debt of gratitude and we send our heartfelt thanks at christmastime. this morning i have meetings with colleagues and others an addition to my dealings in this house i shall of further such meetings later today. >> can i thank my right honorable friend force, to that which he wishes a merry christmas to our service families who are on deployment and their families as well. could my right honorable friend also told what progress is being made by -- [inaudible] especially those who serve on -- [inaudible] >> i thank my honorable friend. on t
] >> you would have thought i would have gotten used to it by now. i will have -- [talking over each other] >> i visited my critically ill constituents last week in a hospital. there were only two nurses on a board of 30 ill patients. she has asked me to ask the prime minister why he has cut the number of nurses. >> the number of clinical staff in our an age as since this government came to power has gone up and the number of managers is significantly down. as my right hon. friend the health secretary said, we are not in the slightest bit complacent. there are parts of the nih as where standards of care and standards of nursing unacceptable. that is why we are introducing things like the friends and family to make sure all hospitals come to a higher standard for the best. >> following publication of the levenson report last week my right hon. friend agrees what we need is a strong independent regulator preferably without statutes? >> i think it is actually a moment where we should try to maximize the american consensus that there is in this house and this country about what is required. ev
it was -- with the curtains drawn that would be affected. can the prime minister tell us how many of those hits are actually in work? >> the fact is this, that welfare -- [shouting] >> welfare needs to be controlled, and everyone, everyone who is on tax credit will be affected by these changes because we have to get on top of the welfare bill. that is why we are restricting the increase on out of work benefits, and it's also the reason why we are restricting in work benefits. but what we've also done is increased the personal allowance because on this side of the house we believe in cutting people's taxes when they are in work. >> ed miliband. >> he is raising the taxes of people in work, and, of course, he didn't answer the question. the answer is despite the impression given by the chancellor of the exchequer, there's over 60% of those affected are in work. it's a factory worker on the night shift, it's they care who looks after the elder people around the clock and the cleaner who cling the chancellor's office while his curtains are still drawn and he is still in bed. [cheers and applause] >> the chancel
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4